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security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently demonstrated the capability of advanced biofuels during massive exercise that featured a carrier strike gr
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
ground among the economists where we are going to end at the end of the date. thank you for joining us very much, and thank you all. we appreciate peterson foundation allowed me to participate and i know that pete has a conversation to wrap things up. >> as i contemplated how to close i remember the nobel prize winner of the university of chicago where i was presumably educated. if you have no alternative you have no problem. so i thought about the alternative of delivering the letter delivered to dramatically of course. thank you very much. i deeply appreciate quality of the panel but also the quality of the audience. so thank you and goodbye. [applause] >> president obama met at the white house with key congressional leaders including house speaker john boehner, house democratic leader nancy pelosi, senate majority leader harry reid and a republican mitch mcconnell. the first meeting since the election. they discussed what to do about expiring busheir tax reductions and across-the-board spending cuts set to hit in january called the fiscal cliff. they allowed cameras in the room befo
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
in a way that human and dogs have used for centuries -- >> so we've had a lot of discussion about whether it's 5 minutes or 15 minutes or whether it's mothballs, i understood the issue to be with us under the fourth amendment whether or not it is a search for the dog to come up to the door and sniff. we're not making a judgment on the probable cause, but the ground of the decision below was this is a search when the dog sniffs. >> you need probable cause just for the dog to sniff. no, that's a absolutely right. and the dog's sniff itself clearly is not a physical invasion in the same way that looking is not a physical invasion under the common law -- >> it isn't the sniffing in the abstract, it's the sniffing at this point. the sniffing at a person's front door, right? >> well, i mean, that's true, your honor, but i think if it wasn't a search for the police officer to walk up there and sniff and report smelling live marijuana, then it wasn't a search when frankie walked up there and alerted to the presence of an illegal narcotic. >> well, i didn't say it wouldn't be a search if the polic
that the employer can use. now, i grant this isn't just a skills training program, but you've got to know how to write, to speak, to think. and i think a lot of our problem is that we graduate many students that don't necessarily do that well. and if the humanity majors, and they do not do that especially well, then they have got trouble. so, and they can't necessarily prove they do those things will. earlier someone said, i think you, jim, talked about the need for computer skills. my guess is that if the humanities majors, major really helped some sort of certification, that showed certain skills. i think that we haven't fully grappled with how to deal with our desire, our feeling that we need to have the humanities as a critical part of the university, we need to have the numbers, students take these. we believe that but we haven't grappled with how we can get these folks jobs. they are not going to get at the big corporations and less they have very good grades. and we can't necessarily, so far, it's not easy for them to establish they have the skills, especially if they don't have those
and certification sufficient to prove the dog was reliable and include the use. second you have experts testify about whether what constitutes a good training program? >> not necessarily experts, but the officer that participated with the dog can testify as to what he and the ball went through to obtain the training certificate and certification. .. drugs will they weren't. what green -- white wooden bed trailer record to be adequate in that circumstance? >> that would be one of several shilling's that would make the training records adequate. also, we want to know whether there are destructors use in the field. however, i don't believe that the record supports -- and this is arguable the minutes training. all the state had for the initial training was deputy morris, a certificate, one certificate that said this dog was trained by the police department for 120 hours with deputy morris and another certificate saying that the stock was certified by narcotics certifications, again with deputy morrison of for one year. >> i guess what i'm asking you is, as a matter of law you want us to hold and th
who mentioned this to me as us going out the door last night, we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz one that when. one in new york when chris lee, he is sending videos or photographs of his shortlist top left office in upstate new york, was replaced by the democrat kathy hogle. and the third, when arizona seat open up after congressman giffords stepped down after the horrible shooting. she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those special elections, and each and every case they said they won because of medicare. did somebody say medicare? at what was, medicare. and then what the democrats had was, and we're going to use that as a template for winning in the twinkling election. didn't work at the congressional -- 2012 election. women look at the exit polls and we see why people voted and how they voted, sometimes it's not so civil. the exit polls have some very strange results. i'll get into a couple of these. is the country had in the right direction or sears off on the wrong trac
nations, was the weight to get alongside these afghans, and we saw -- i was in kabul when the two u.s. officers were shot in the national military police coordination center in the moi. there was an absolute bizarre for those who were present on the day to -- doug touched on this as proximity with the afghans, and it's very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> [inaudible] >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful withdrawal of u.k. combat troops by the end of 2014. >> i absolutely understand the investments, and there's a lot of material. my headquarters absolutely understand how much we have got to move over the time? >> the overall general plan of withdrawal, will you be able to be successful do you think? >> yes, i will. noting, of course, that the national operation is inside a wider nato operation, and a great deal of work is being done in nato to deliver that coordination. >> thanks. >> i want the to ask along the table, are we seriously led to believe that on the january the 1st, 2015, that the afghan national security forces will be susta
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
to join us today. susan is the bureau chief of usa today where she writes about the white house and national policy and won a slew of awards for distinguished reporting on the presidency, but brandon smith memorial award for deadline reporting on the presidency and coverage of the presidency and a lot of other awards. use a regular guest hosts of the diane beam show on pbs and cnn and many other broadcast outlets. a native of wichita, kan. she received a bachelor's degree from northwest and journalism from columbia where she was a pulitzer fellow. she will be followed by vicki edwards to is electorate at princeton university's woodrow wilson school of public policy international affairs. .. great pleasure to be here with the four people for whom i have so much admiration and the wife quoted so much time and so many stories. i have i think a little bit of news which is i found out the title of the next book that is coming out between tom so you can figure out the 1992 book by renewing congress. it sounds pretty positive. 2000, the permanent campaign. okay maybe not entirely posit
it's difficult. they could be very lengthy. and to have effectively used, you need to have a credible threat of violence along with it, in order to get people to the table and to listen. if we're just going to use soft power and niceties, nothing will be done. it is indeed a whirlpool. the turks certainly near the border are fed up with this. off and on. erdogan mentions baby will go to war, maybe we won't. it's right on their border. the turks brought the military to the border to send a signal. this good kicking to in article five, nader. now, that would be quite a mess. and, of course, the russians have their only naval base outside the former soviet union in syria. ladies and gentlemen, the russians are a very big part of this problem. i would not assume that the united states is the main issue here. if the russians and the chinese play ball on this, this could've been resolved a long time ago. but my sense is pessimistic. my sense, it's probably too late to put humpty dumpty of syria back together again. it has festered too long. all of this time that something could h
together, you know, are going to bankrupt us in the future. and, you know, medicare, it's all health care. if we don't solve that problem, we've got a problem whether it's the government spending or private spending. so we've got health care cost inflation as the number one problem. the aging is really not that big of a problem. with social security we saved money in the trust fund to get us past most of the peak boomer retirement years. life expectancy growth is so moderate as a factor compared to other things that once the baby boomers retire, costs as a share of g, the p -- gdp level off. there is a little growth in life expectancy, but it's very minor. if there's a demographic problem, it's the dropoff in births, not, you know, in population growth which has to do with immigration and the birthrate and not with life expectancy. and for the record, i'm in favor of gradually increasing the payroll tax to offset increases in life expectancy because it would be so slow and so modest that it wouldn't be much of a tax increase, and it would sort of shut people up altogether. but usually, of
enlighten us as to what went right, what went wrong. obviously, all wasn't hunky dory. there were so many people that lost power, and is that something that could not be prevented? is it something that if we changed certain things might be prevented in the future? you know, last summer a storm knocked out 911 in the east coast. these things are becoming more and more commonplace. so what a hearing would do would allow us to investigate the reliability of the communications networks and to identify and highlight the best practices and, where necessary, to address potential vulnerabilities in our communications infrastructure. so i would welcome, obviously, i want the hear what the telecommunications industry has to say, and they can help enlighten congress as to what we should be doing to prevent this from happening in the future. >> host: representative engel, have you heard back from chairman upton? >> guest: well, no, we have not, but the letter was just recently sent out, and it was sent to chairman upton and chairman walden who's the chairman on the telecommunications subcommittee. th
israel was hard. does he agree with me that the use of long range imported missiles by hamas capable of striking jerusalem has made this much were difficult to achieve? >> yes, absolutely. it is clear that the armory of rockets in gaza has changed since the time of operation, and although there is a longer range rockets, we seen them launch at tel aviv and at least in one case at jerusalem. of course that is an escalation of the threat to israel. but it only underlines the importance of taking forward all the work on a negotiated piece and settlement in the middle east so which has been supported across the house. >> in august this year in a report that gaza would be unlivable by 2020, 44% of posting in gaza -- [inaudible] what conversation has he had with counterparts recently on increasing basic humanitarian coming into gaza and that continues to increase? >> this is a constant part of discussions with israeli leaders. of course, we put the case for that, and, indeed, more than that, in saying not only that humanitarian relief is required but that the difference in more an open app
and ranking member mccain for their patience and persistence in allowing us to get to this vote. i think once i discuss the bill for a moment, it might not seem like it required much patience to get here but it did. i appreciate it. the history of this amendment is it began as a bill in the senate. this bill passed out of the health, education, labor and pensions committee unanimously, by unanimous consent. an identical bill passed through the house of representatives under suspension. so in many respects it is noncontroversial. i want to also thank while i'm here chairman harkin and ranking member enzi of the help committee for their help getting it through the help committee unanimously and for clearing it for a vote here today on the floor. the bill has at this point nearly 60 cosponsors. it has 18 republican cosponsors. and i wish to thank them individually and by name. senators blunt, boozman, brown of massachusetts, chambliss, cochran, collins, crapo, grassley, heller, hutchison, isakson, kirk, lugar, moran, murkowski, rubio, snowe, and wicker, in addition to all of my democratic cospon
-span. up next, a house debate with u.s. representative and former republican presidential candidate michele bachmann and her democratic challenger, jim graves to represent minnesota's 6th congressional district. then at 9 a.m. eastern we are live with an analysis of the competitive house and senate races with two former congressmen, republican tom davis and democrat martin who each chaired their respective parties' campaign committees. >> when i watch c-span, i watch the morning journal. i like the give and take there. i like the balanced approach. and i also like to hear the callers. i don't call myself, but i like to hear the callers. some of them are unusual, to say the least. some of them are thought-provoking too. c-span is everywhere. c-span in washington is just at every event, you know, small hearing, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in many 1979 -- in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, representative michele bachmann faces
was talking about it gets us to solve that problem over a period of ten years. i thought ten years was too long basically. that was not an endorsement of every single item in the budget but the direction is going in, and whether or not i would support cutting if i supported that the budget i don't know. i have to look at the budget and see what cuts are necessary, but the most important point to remember is this. half of the budget is reform of the tax code to get the economy flat in the tax rates, lower the rates or on the base deutsch a trillion dollars of credits and the major corporations might take advantage to get the economy going and get revenues back up, get people back to work and you have less need for these programs and if it was to save the country to do it in a responsible way. >> i will get to it in a moment i'm not putting your words in your mouth. i want to understand in the short term over the next year or two would you cut the liheap funding of? diamondstone: if i were in the senate today i would spend as much money as i could get without breaking the back of the budget
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19